Module 3: Planning

Welcome to Module 3, Planning. In this Module you’ll have an opportunity to integrate climate change implications with standard project management planning considerations. You’ll also start applying them in a case study situation.

Module 3 Learning Goals

This Module will help you:

  • Develop awareness of how climate change affects project management in all stages
  • Focus on what you can do in the planning stage to address climate change
  • Find tools, frameworks or approaches to help you add a climate change lens to your planning

 

Readings & Resources

Required for Module 3.1 activities – also included in course content

The Four Phases of Project Management, Harvard Business Review staff (2016).

Guidelines for Project Managers: Making vulnerable investments climate resilient, Report for the European Commission (2012), Acclimatise and COWI, https://web.law.columbia.edu/sites/default/files/microsites/climate-change/ec_guidelines_for_project_managers.pdf

Climate Compass – A climate risk management framework for Commonwealth agencies (2018), CSIRO, Australia, https://www.environment.gov.au/climate-change/adaptation/publications/climate-compass-climate-risk-management-framework

Summary of ISO 14090 Principles – Summary assembled by course developer from ISO 14090:2019 Adaptation to climate change — Principles, requirements and guidelines https://www.iso.org/standard/68507.html (link removed to comply with copyright).

Required for Module 3.2 Activities

ReTooling for climate change site to familiarize yourself with some available tools https://www.retooling.ca/retooling_essentials.html

European Climate Adaptation Platform Climate-ADAPT https://climate-adapt.eea.europa.eu/knowledge/tools/uncertainty-guidance/topic3

Required for all modules

Smoky River Transit Case

Other readings and resources that may be helpful for Module 3.3 tools swap meet

Climate Lens – General Guidance, Infrastructure Canada, https://www.infrastructure.gc.ca/pub/other-autre/cl-occ-eng.html#1.1

Strategic Assessment of Climate Change, Environment and Climate Change Canada, July 2020 https://www.strategicassessmentclimatechange.ca/

Climate Data Canada portal, https://climatedata.ca/

Data portal, Pacific Climate Impacts Consortium (PCIC), University of Victoria https://pacificclimate.org/data

Plan2Adapt, a PCIC tool https://pacificclimate.org/analysis-tools/plan2adapt

PIEVC Engineering Protocol, Public Infrastructure Engineering Vulnerability Committee https://pievc.ca/

Study of the Impacts of Climate Change on Precipitation and Stormwater Management, Metro Vancouver http://www.metrovancouver.org/services/liquid-waste/LiquidWastePublications/Climatechangeimpactsprecipitationstormwater2050-2100%E2%80%93Technical-brief-2018.pdf

Adapting to Climate Change Canada’s First National Engineering Vulnerability Assessment of Public Infrastructure (2008), Canadian Council of Professional Engineers, https://pievc.ca/sites/default/files/adapting_to_climate_change_report_final.pdf

ISO 14090:2019 Adaptation to climate change — Principles, requirements and guidelines https://www.iso.org/standard/68507.html

Core principles for successfully implementing and upscaling Nature-based Solutions (2019) E. Cohen-Shacham, et al, Environmental Science and Policy 98, accessible from https://www.iucn.org/theme/ecosystem-management/our-work/iucn-global-standard-nature-based-solutions

Galore Creek Mining Case Study http://www.climateontario.ca/doc/reports/fbc_mining_case_study_galore_creek.pdf

Metrolinx Climate Adaptation Strategy (2018) Download PDF from http://www.metrolinx.com/en/aboutus/sustainability/default.aspx

In Module 3, we explore familiar territory for project managers, project planning, through the lens of climate change. As we have heard in Module 1 interviews, there is an abundance of resources on climate change. We will gain familiarity with these tools and exchange lessons learned in applying them.

Activities for this module will include:

3.1 Adding climate change considerations to a standard project management approach (Google doc)
3.2 Gaining familiarity with climate change tools
3.3 Participating in virtual swap meet of climate change tools (Padlet)
3.4 Preparing to discuss Smoky River case study planning issues
3.5 Participating in live Collaborate discussion


3.1 Climate change considerations in planning (readings and Google doc)

The project management approaches and frameworks you use now continue to be relevant in a time of climate change, but we may need to approach them with a new perspective and understanding of climate risks and key stakeholders.

In this section we will take a traditional project management framework and consider how climate change considerations can inform it. We will build this collaboratively through a Google doc. See below.

Let’s start by reading or scanning the following:

Activity

Contribute to a collaborative document (i.e Google Doc) to show where and how climate change considerations might show up in the HBR approach.

<Note to instructor: Create a collaborative doc with the following>

Project Management Stage
How could you consider climate change at this stage?
Planning
Determine the real problem to solve
Identify stakeholders
Define project objectives
Determine scope, resource and major tasks
Prepare for trade-offs
Build Up
Assemble your team
Plan assignments
Create the schedule
Hold kickoff meeting
Develop budget
Implementation
Monitor and control process and budget
Report progress
Hold weekly meetings
Manage problems
Closeout
Evaluate project performance
Close out project
Debrief with team

 

3.2 Climate change tools for project management in the planning stage

To effectively integrate climate change into your project planning you may need the following kinds of “tools” (term used loosely):

  • Climate change information and education – general or specific science-based knowledge about how climate change works and what kinds of impacts we can expect
  • Data services – services that help us understand how the climate may change in the locations that matter to our project
  • Risk assessment – tools to help you understand climate change hazards specific to your project, recognize vulnerabilities, evaluate risks, and develop options to address the risks
  • Community planning – tools for preparing and implementing local climate change strategies
  • Sector or location specific guidance – guides, manuals, case studies and other tools

Below are two great places to start to get a sense of the tools available. Please explore:

ReTooling for climate change site to familiarize yourself with some available tools https://www.retooling.ca/retooling_essentials.html

European Climate Adaptation Platform Climate-ADAPT https://climate-adapt.eea.europa.eu/knowledge/tools/uncertainty-guidance/topic3

The readings and resources section for this module is organized around the above categories (some tools span categories and other categorization is possible).

Once you’re familiar with some tools, our next activity will be to share our experiences or tips about tools, through a virtual “swap meet”. In a swap meet, you show up with stuff you have used and want to share, and you can pick up some new stuff.

Use the Padlet in word or video to tell us about one tool you’re bringing to the swap meet. How did you use it and why do you love it? You can also ask others if they have a used tool that might help you.

 

3.3 Activity: Virtual Swap Meet

Welcome to our climate change tools swap meet!

In a swap meet, you show up with stuff you have used and want to share, and you can pick up some new stuff.

Use the Padlet through words or video to tell us about one tool you’re bringing to the swap meet. How did you use it and why do you love it? You can also ask others if they have a used tool that might help you.

3.4 Smoky River Transit Case Study

In our synchronous session this week, we will discuss some planning questions in our case study. To prepare, please review the case and watch the video.

Review: Smoky River Transit Case

Watch video interview 3 with Robert Siddall – Question: What are the most useful things project managers can do at the planning stage of a new transit project, to consider climate change?


Video: Interview 3 with Robert Siddall


Reflect on questions 2 & 4 in the Case Study

3.5 Synchronous Discussion

In this session we will continue our discussion of the Smoky River case study, with a focus on a key planning issue – data needs.

Join the session prepared to discuss:

  • What data would help Hazel manage uncertainty about future climate change and where/how could she get it?

This is a one hour discussion.

 

License

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Project Management for a Changing Climate by Royal Roads University is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, except where otherwise noted.

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